Author Archives: Elizabeth Villa

Maurice and Ida May “Pat” Eby: Accomplished New Mexico Photographers

In the 1980s, thousands of photographs taken by award winning photographers Maurice and Pat Eby were donated to NMSU Library Archives and Special Collections (ASC). The Eby’s photographs have been featured in several magazines, often running on the cover of New Mexico Magazine, produced as postcards, and exhibited internationally. Maurice also photographed New Mexico College…
Continue reading “Maurice and Ida May “Pat” Eby: Accomplished New Mexico Photographers” »

Posted in Finding Aids and Guides, Photography, Rio Grande Historical Collections | Tagged , | Comments Off on Maurice and Ida May “Pat” Eby: Accomplished New Mexico Photographers

Getting to Know Elizabeth Villa, Archives Specialist, Ld 

Getting to Know ASC staff is a series spotlighting staff from the NMSU Archives and Special Collections department.   Background information: My plan for college was to study business, for some reason I no longer recall, but during my senior year of high school I took a photography class—my first real art class since elementary school….
Continue reading “Getting to Know Elizabeth Villa, Archives Specialist, Ld ” »

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Did You Know?, Staff News | Tagged , | Comments Off on Getting to Know Elizabeth Villa, Archives Specialist, Ld 

Virtual meeting backgrounds

In this world of virtual meetings, we thought we’d share a selection of photographs from our collections to use as a background. Travel back in time to Las Cruces in 1905, the Elephant Butte Dam construction site in 1916, or work out of the Physics Department computer lab in 1985.  Click on an image to view the full size, and right-click to save…
Continue reading “Virtual meeting backgrounds” »

Posted in Border Region, Campus History, Photography, Rio Grande Historical Collections, University Archives | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Virtual meeting backgrounds

The Yabumoto family of Chamberino

In recognition of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Archives and Special Collections (ASC) would like to highlight the life experiences of the Yabumoto family of Chamberino, New Mexico. Riuhei Yabumoto came from a family of fishermen in the Wakayama prefecture of Japan. He was born in 1867 in the village of Tawara. In 1896 he…
Continue reading “The Yabumoto family of Chamberino” »

Posted in Border Region, Did You Know?, Oral History, Rio Grande Historical Collections | Tagged , , | Comments Off on The Yabumoto family of Chamberino

Henry Trost’s Design for a Fledgling Agricultural School

New Mexico State University began as Las Cruces College in a two-room adobe building near downtown Las Cruces in 1888. It became New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1890 when it received 100-acres of land from Jacob Schaublin, becoming the territory’s land-grant agricultural school. The first building constructed on the campus was…
Continue reading “Henry Trost’s Design for a Fledgling Agricultural School” »

Posted in Campus History, Did You Know?, University Archives | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Henry Trost’s Design for a Fledgling Agricultural School

Kathleen Kelly, WASP

  In the collections of the Hobson-Huntsinger University Archives in Archives and Special Collections (ASC), are hundreds of letters written to and from former students turned soldiers of World War II. Dean of Engineering Daniel B. Jett, fondly referred to as “Dad” Jett, would create class newsletters and write to his former students to check…
Continue reading “Kathleen Kelly, WASP” »

Posted in Campus History, Did You Know?, University Archives | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Kathleen Kelly, WASP

Segregation in Las Cruces Public Schools

As the NMSU campus celebrates Black History Month, the Open Stacks hopes to highlight the achievements of Black students, faculty, and staff, as well as those throughout New Mexico and the Borderlands. Many black families migrating to New Mexico around the early part of the 20th century came in hopes of escaping the Jim Crow…
Continue reading “Segregation in Las Cruces Public Schools” »

Posted in Border Region, Did You Know? | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Segregation in Las Cruces Public Schools

Panoramic Photography at Archives and Special Collections 

A Brief History NMSU Archives and Special Collections (ASC) has a number of panoramic images in its collections. Most date from the early to mid-1900s. These images capture military installments, mining operations, events, and landscapes across New Mexico. Panoramic photography came into existence not long after the development of photography itself. Photographers wanted a better way to show…
Continue reading “Panoramic Photography at Archives and Special Collections ” »

Posted in Did You Know?, Photography, Rio Grande Historical Collections | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Panoramic Photography at Archives and Special Collections 

Dr. Sarah E. Stewart, Mexican-American Cancer Researcher

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month,  Archives and Special Collections would like to highlight the life and career of NMSU alumna Dr. Sarah Elizabeth Stewart, a Mexican-American cancer researcher.   George Stewart, an American mining engineer with interests in Jalisco, Mexico met and married Maria Andrade while working in the region. On August 16, 1906, their daughter Sarah was born. With the start of the Mexican Revolution…
Continue reading “Dr. Sarah E. Stewart, Mexican-American Cancer Researcher” »

Posted in Did You Know?, University Archives | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Dr. Sarah E. Stewart, Mexican-American Cancer Researcher

The Flood of 1935

On August 29, 1935, 6.46 inches of rain fell on Las Cruces. It was the wettest day in the city’s recorded history. Rainwaters rushed down from the Organ Mountains, filling the arroyos that wove through town and raising the water level of the Rio Grande. Failed or absent drainage systems resulted in up to 4…
Continue reading “The Flood of 1935” »

Posted in Border Region, Photography, Rio Grande Historical Collections | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on The Flood of 1935